The New World

by bookindian

Ragtime with tha trashman . . . or maybe it should be “boro” man (rag man) . . .
yeh . . . well, I decided to start putting bit and pieces of some of my denim “rag” inventory to-geddah . . . “testifying” for my worn, reused “vintage” garment concept . . . the use of old “jeans” for “new” coats/jackets actually actually started about two years ago . . . I had some BIG plans for fabricating distressed denim clothing . . . stuff completely unlike the commercial stuff from Wrangler et al, and other runway designer offerings . . .

BORO

How it begins . . .

. . . I’ve been rummaging through the Internet doing some research . . . Japanese “boro“, “ranru“, and “noragi” fabric and clothing . . . some “sashiko” stitchery . . . AND everyone is reading each others blogs and re-posting what’s already been “writ“(ten) . . . redundant crap.

While my work is not “true” Japanese “boro” (I don’t use vintage Japanese fabric for one . . .) it is “boro” style . . . it IS pieced and layered rag patchwork using old used denim fabric with wear holes, use-faded color, and unfinished edges.

BORO

I was trained to look at a 2D composition sideways, upside down, etc., to check the overall “balance” of the shapes, lines, and colors . . . and that’s how I approach the layout of each of my rag works . . . each panel is constructed on the floor . . . sort of like Jackson Pollock laying canvas on his studio floor to get the “background” drips and spatters in place, and then climbing up on the ladder to get a different perspective before the detail elements of the painting are added . . . AND . . . I have a “boro“/”ranru“/’noragi“/”sashiko” image catalog that I browse through . . . periodically.

BORO

. . . on the workroom floor.

Here’s some pics to illustrate my adaptation and/or use of the “boro” style . . .
The panels will be used either as the back of a haori-style jacket/coat or as a multi-use “throw” (lap-blanket, rug, etc.) . . .

BORO

The photo above is of a patchwork piece that will have additional pieces of fabric sewn around the perimeter to increase the width of the panel to make it “usable” as the back of a jacket . . .

BORO

Finished panel

BORO

Another finished panel . . .

And I should explain . . . me, myself, and I . . . and the “Japanese connection” beyond just being “an old Japanese come back as a Paiute Indian.”

BORO

I am (Auf deutsch) Owens Talpaiute-inder, that is: an Owens Valley Paiute Indian, a member of the Big Pine Band of the Owens Valley Paiute; and, as such, I have interacted with Korean and Japanese artists, and their respective community members, as a person with a distinct cultural identity . . . not as a “Native American” or even as an “American Indian”, but as a Paiute Indian and a photographer.

BORO

5 p.m.

An anthropologist once said that I was the first “truly” bi-cultural person that he had met. What he meant was that I had maintained a strong connection with my ethnic beliefs and material cultural practices, and was also well versed in the cultural practices of the dominant Euro-American society, and moved “seamlessly” between the two.

BORO

. . . lava light . . .

To be continued . . .

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