Petroglyphs . . . again

by bookindian

. . . revisited the petroglyphs of Tuesday past . . . unless some serious management of the accessible petroglyph sites is implemented by the Bureau of Land Management, the value of this unique resource will drop to zero . . . visitors climbing or walking on the panels, shooting, attempting to remove sections of panels, and re-pecking or adding to existing imagery, will eventually ruin the sites, destroying any remaining archaeological or visual significance of the sites . . . If you access the petroglyphs sites for the first time, do not expect to see anything like cliff dwellings, ruins or pictographs . . . “this ain’t the southwest . . .”

PICTS

. . . anyway, I accompanied two people on a tour of the sites I visited on Tuesday and shot more photos with the Canon 10D, primarily as a visual document of the features ca. 2010, for my personal library . . . focused on the Red Canyon site (personal site designation).

PICTS

PICTS

PICTS

It was a good day for photos . . . slightly overcast and no wind.

PICTS

PICTS

The following two images are from an isolated boulder . . . reminders of the settling of the eastern Sierra region.

PICTS

Did you stop for a soak at Keough’s Hot Springs? They used to have a community easter egg hunt there every year, many, many moons ago.

PICTS

. . . on the way home, I turned off highway 395 to visit a “pictograph” site that I monitor on a fairly regular basis, a local site I call “the silos” . . .

SILOS

I have the Ms. Pacman app on my iPod Touch . . .

SILOS

SILOS

This was the first time I photographed the silos in the late afternoon.

SILOS

SILOS

Although graffiti can be crap, the more elaborate panels provide some insight into a subset of the regional culture, in this case, a young adult (16-25) group . . . familiar with psychedelics, THC, and alcohol. Some of the visual content has been sprayed over with new paint, however, there are several sections here that have been untouched for more that 12 months.

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